The Times reports on the FBI memos announced by the ACLU yesterday”:

One of the memorandums released Monday was addressed to Robert S. Mueller III, the F.B.I. director, and other senior bureau officials, and it provided the account of someone “who observed serious physical abuses of civilian detainees” in Iraq. The memorandum, dated June 24 this year, was an “Urgent Report,” meaning that the sender regarded it as a priority. It said the witness “described that such abuses included strangulation, beatings, placement of lit cigarettes into the detainees’ ear openings and unauthorized interrogations.” The memorandum did not make clear whether the witness was an agent or an informant, and it said there had also been an effort to cover up the abuses. The writer of the memorandum said Mr. Mueller should be aware of what was occurring because “of potential significant public, media and Congressional interest which may generate calls to the director.” The document does not provide further details of the abuse, but suggests that such treatment of prisoners in Iraq was the subject of an investigation conducted by the bureau’s Sacramento office.

In one memorandum, dated Dec. 5, 2003, an agent whose name is blanked out on the document expressed concern about military interrogators’ posing as F.B.I. agents at the Guantánamo camp. The agent wrote that the memorandum was intended as an official record of the interrogators’ behavior because, “If this detainee is ever released or his story made public in any way, D.O.D. interrogators will not be held accountable because these torture techniques were done by ‘F.B.I.’ interrogators. The F.B.I. will be left holding the bag before the public.” D.O.D. is an abbreviation for the Department of Defense. Asked about the possible impersonation of F.B.I. agents by military personnel, Bryan Whitman, the deputy Pentagon spokesman, said Monday that “It is difficult to determine from the secondhand description whether the technique” was permissible.

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