Jesse Jackson calls for every vote to be counted:

In Ohio, a court just ruled there can’t be a recount yet, because the vote is not yet counted. It’s three weeks after the election, and Ohio still hasn’t counted the votes and certified the election. Some 93,000 overvotes and undervotes are not counted; 155,000 provisional ballots are only now being counted. Absentee ballots cast in the two days prior to the election haven’t been counted. Ohio determines the election, but the state has not yet counted the vote. That outrage is made intolerable by the fact that the secretary of state in charge of this operation, Ken Blackwell, holds — like Katherine Harris of Florida’s fiasco in 2000 — a dual role: secretary of state with control over voting procedures and co-chair of George Bush’s Ohio campaign. Blackwell should recuse himself so that a thorough investigation, count and recount of Ohio’s vote can be made.

Blackwell reversed rules on provisional ballots in place in the spring primaries. These allowed voters to cast provisional ballots anywhere in their county, even if they were in the wrong precinct, reflecting the chief rationale for provisional ballots: to ensure that those who went to the wrong place by mistake could have their votes counted. The result of this decision — why does this not surprise? — was to disqualify disproportionately ballots cast in heavily Democratic Cuyahoga County. Blackwell also permitted the use of electronic machines that provided no paper record. The maker of many of these machines, the head of Diebold Co., promised to deliver Ohio for Bush. In one precinct in Franklin County, an electric voting system gave Bush 3,893 extra votes out of a total of 638 votes cast. Blackwell also presided over a voting system that resulted in quick, short lines in the dominantly Republican suburbs, and four-hour and longer waiting lines in the inner cities. Wealthy precincts received ample numbers of voting machines and numerous voting places. Democratic precincts received inadequate numbers of machines in too few polling places that were often hard to locate; this caused daylong waits for the very working people who could least afford the time.

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